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 Post subject: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2012 4:20 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 6:55 am
Posts: 518
Yesterday I shredded up a pound of my burley N-126 that has been hanging on the stalk in the shed for 1 full year. It smoked very nice with no further curing necessary.
N-126 is a commercial seed availabe from newton tobacco in hopkinsville kentucky. It is available in pelleted form. It is very similar to yellow twist bud. I did have a lot of suckers to trim however.
This year I grew tn90 a similar tobacco, mild burley, large leaves and sturdy stalks. It looks just like the N-126 when mature. The most pleasant thing about tn90 was the very few suckers to trim.
Dr.Bob


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 Post subject: Re: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2012 7:31 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 9:51 pm
Posts: 1130
Location: near Blacksburg, VA
DrBob,
I've been scurrying about, trying to find a prompt disposition for the varieties that I stalk-harvested this season, theoretically to clear the shed space for the remainder of my crop. Since I don't really need additional space at this time, your post helped map out my path of least resistance. I will just let the stalks hang, then take them down before the 2013 crop begins to come in. That is contrary to my urge to somehow "complete" them by "doing" something to them.

This season, I've stalk-harvested Harrow Velvet, Glessnor, Lancaster Seedleaf, WI Seedleaf, WI 901, Little Yellow, and soon, Golden Burley. Those that I've already kilned have been tasty, but doing nothing seems a better plan, so long as the space exists. I think the key is to allow them to hang for at least a month after the onset of warm weather in the spring.

Most new growers have not planted a large enough crop to make just waiting a practical solution. So, planting more than a 1 year supply actually saves the work of quickly finishing the leaf, at least for some of the crop.

Bob


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 Post subject: Re: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2012 12:01 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:45 pm
Posts: 1751
Location: Houston, TX
drbob wrote:
It is very similar to yellow twist bud.

Are you talking about it's growing traits or the taste? I grew YTB two years ago and found it to be better suited for cigar or pipe tobacco. I dropped it from my growing list along with MCY. For the record I just cured it longer and added smaller amounts of it in with Silver River, Common Burley and VA Gold Leaf. Like everyone else, I waste nothing.


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 Post subject: Re: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:41 pm
Posts: 708
Location: NE Washington
TN 90 is without a doubt my favorite burley. It is also currently the most widely grown tobacco in the world. It grows well in a wide variety of climates and soils, produces large numbers of high quality leaves, almost no suckers, and turns a beautiful yellow when ripe. It can be primed or stalk hung and practically cures itself. And it has very good resistance to several tobacco viruses and PVY. It is nearly identical to its predecessor, TN 86, but has a 7-10 day earlier time to flower. I grew both again this year. Next year I am going to try the next in the line, TN 97. What I really want is TN 97LC if anyone knows where to get seed in a small quantity.

As much as I love TN 90, I found a Burley this year that may just replace it as my favorite. Like the N-126, it was also developed by Newton Seed. Newton Burley Hybrid 98, aka, NBH 98. It produced the largest leaves of any burley that I have grown yet and out produced the TN 90 in total weight. It's a little shorter in height and the leaves are closer on the stalk. Plant form is more similar to VA 509. It produced almost no suckers, bloomed in about 65 days and like TN 90 and TN 86, its a no brainer to cure. I have yet to smoke any, but I am thinking this one will be one I grow every year.

I grew Harrow Velvet and Golden Burley last year. I wouldn't hesitate to plant either again. They are not as heavy of producers as some Burleys, but do produce some beautiful golden leaf. Golden Burley was named right. It really turns gold when ripe. One thing that stood out to me about these 2 varieties was the short time they needed to age. Both we very smokable after only 2-3 months of hanging. Nice medium flavored smoke.


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 Post subject: Re: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 4:21 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 6:55 am
Posts: 518
This is my 5th season of growing tobacco. I grow tobacco to save money. And save money I do! A crop of 200 plants pretty much covers the needs of two in the household.
Stalk hanging saves time in the harvest. I cut the plants down and let them lay a day or two until they wilt and are easy to transport without bruising. then I hang them up in the shed and forget about them for a year. The burley tobacco is pretty much good to go then!

It took me less than 4 hours to plant. 1 hour to cut them down, and 3 hours to hang them up. Stripping the stalks the next year takes about 4 hours. I put the leaves in boxes and store them in the garage. I shred about 10# at a time and store the shredded tobacco in the freezer until I use it up.

I am just lazy I guess, but it is efficient. For me the less time I spend on the crop the better! It does help to have a lot of tobacco in storage too...

I still cure the virginia in the chamber a week or two. The crockpot curing chamber does wonders for it. All in all the curing chamber is just a way to accelerate the aging process. If you can wait long enough the curing chamber is not necessary.
Dr.Bob


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 Post subject: Re: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 6:24 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:45 pm
Posts: 1751
Location: Houston, TX
drbob wrote:
I shred about 10# at a time and store the shredded tobacco in the freezer until I use it up.

How doe this effect the texture and taste?


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 Post subject: Re: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:12 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 4337
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
lol
I'm with drbob on this one, as much as I enjoy the time I spend in the patch !

There's always plenty to do battling the deer and other critters, so keeping the sucker chores to a minimum is high on the list.

I'm thinking transplant timing and fertilizer application are significant in the number of suckers that are produced.

My sprouts were put in the ground mid-May and were given a very small amount of N before they were a foot tall. None following that. Prior to transplant, I had used liquid Kelp Extract in their water during the sprout stage.

Sucker growth was extensive, in almost all strains!
A lotta darn work! lol

Presently, I've got extensive 2nd growth that may rival the primary growth which has been harvested.

Stalk harvesting and air curing will be necessary because of the volume I've accidentally generated!

The crockpot method has worked well for me in a too small tent/chamber, when managed suitably, yet now, later in the season, I suspect I will need to have more circulation in a much larger tent I shall need to fabricate. Probably a lean-to against the side of the building.

As one member suggested, I'm going to give a try hanging the plants right-side up, in hopes they get more air.

Best
rc


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 Post subject: Re: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:31 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 6:55 am
Posts: 518
freezing does not effect shredded tobacco. I freeze to keep the tobacco mildewing. I store leaf tobacco very dry I humidify the tobacco before shredding.
I live in wisconsin and the drying shed freezes all winter


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 Post subject: Re: air cured burley
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 12:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:45 pm
Posts: 1751
Location: Houston, TX
I had not thought about bagging it and freezing it and was just curious if it became brittle to the point of powdering or changed the taste.


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